Snaggo' - A lipless 3d printed lure

Snaggo' - A lipless 3d printed lure

thingiverse

Added a jointed version, it will require you to construct some twisted wire joints in order to assemble (tons of videos out there, basically make one twisted wire loop, then create a second one linked to the first). Unlike the first version the jointed version uses a 14mm hole for weights, you can either use a 12-13mm steel, lead, copper or glass sphere, or fill it with epoxy and steel/lead shot. The hollow version is for resin printing (make sure you pause so the resin drains, otherwise you'll have to drill drain holes after printing) The solid version is for standard FDM printing, recommended printing at 30% infill or greater, you'll have to experiment to figure out what % infill behaves the best for the lure you want (ie. denser for sinking, lighter infill for floating). If you don't mind the DIY, the jointed version is absolutely the superior option. When printed hollow and reeled at a medium rate, it "walks" back and forth on the surface with significant waves. ======================================================================Update! After getting some time to test it I can now describe the action. I can say with certainty that a bit more belly weight up front is absolutely a great idea, feel free to drill/add a hole and toss in steel or lead shot for a bit more heft, it'll help the action and let it sink faster. With the following setup: - Snaggo' version 1.2 - 0.7mm twisted steel wire - 6mm twisted steel rings (x2) - Treble hooks (x2) - Solid fill resin print, superglue used for adhesion, 3x clear coats with spray enamel and some acrylic paint. The basic action on a slow retrieve is to meander/twist slightly to each side * A sharp tug will cause it to dive 2-5in, then turn ~70 degrees to one side and come to a quick stop, almost like it's fighting * If left to sink, it will sink about 4in/sec with a tail-first bias * A fast retrieve will make it run top-water, you can make it "jump" with quick spurts of reeling speed, otherwise it will drag on the surface and look like a hooked baitfish fighting the line and current while being dragged in. If you find a fast, clear stream, you could probably just let it "swim" in line against the current and wait for a hit. In saltwater, it sinks at about half the rate, and behaves more sluggishly. Activity was poor where I tested, but It did get some attention from some medium sized common snook down in FL (chases, a couple of missed strikes). If you intend to use it in salt water, be sure to use copper, brass, aluminum, or stainless steel wire, otherwise you will experience significant rusting. Also ensure your clear coat can handle salt water, my version using spray enamel began to peel and chip off after a few days of use. The one with 2-part casting epoxy fared a lot better in the harsher environment, but isn't as user friendly to apply to the lure. ****After modifying a couple prototypes with suggested mods (one with a lip, and one with a top-mount line ring) I found them to have terrible action, either fighting the lip or fighting the line holder. I'd recommend adding weight to the front of the current design (either slightly before or after the front hook hanger) if you want a more dramatic or stable action.**** ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ** V1.2 now up, changes: - Deeper grooves for wire - Smaller pins to hopefully make assembly less fiddly - A sharper taper top to bottom to look more natural and bring the center of mass down -A deeper internal pocket for larger bearings and/or more air for buoyancy, since the previous version sank pretty quickly with hooks. If you have any recommended changes please let me know via the comments or message, happy fishing! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Recently got back into fishing and got hooked (pun intended) on youtube makers creating lures from scratch. I'm not much of a woodworker, but figured I could crank something nifty out on my resin printer. Here's my first design of a fishing lure, designed for use with 2x treble hooks and a twisted wire frame/spine made from 0.7-0.9mm wire. There's also a pocket inside so you can add small ball bearings to make it a rattle bait, or to add weights to help it sink, leave it hollow for a topwater or slow-sinker (depending on your wire and hooks). There are also indexing pins to make sure everything lines up for final assembly. Once you have everything balanced and sinking/floating/vibing as you like, twist the 0.8mm wire to make 3 loops (one for the line, two for snap hooks/treble attachment) and lay it into the internal groove. Add a couple drops of superglue to the index pin holes, line everything up, and clamp together to get a solid seal. Paint as you'd like, and clear-coat for bling. Add your preferred brand of treble hooks and snap rings, string up and go fish! Full scale it should be roughly 130mm in length, you can scale up/down as needed, just be sure to account for the changes in wire/hook size needed for larger or smaller prints.

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